Sunday, June 13 2021

Quote of the Day

Artists spend more of their lives making bad practice pieces than they do masterworks, particularly at the start. And even when an artist becomes a master, some pieces don’t work out. Still others are somehow just wrong until the last stroke.

You learn more from bad art than you do from good art, as your mistakes are more important than your successes. Plus, good art usually evokes the same emotions in people–most good art is the same kind of good. But bad pieces can each be bad in their own unique way. So I’m glad we have bad art, and I’m sure the Almighty agrees.

Brandon Sanderson, Oathbringer

Building without expansion

Terra Nil is a “reverse city builder” where you restore an ecosystem

In Terra Nil, your goal is twofold. Your first task is to reclaim a barren wasteland, finding ways to reintroduce plants and wildlife into an ecologically devastated area…Once your ecosystem is up and running again, your job shifts: now you’ll need to up stakes and leave, removing any traces of your presence in the area, and completing your work to restore the area to its former natural glory.

PC Games

It’s not out yet, but I can’t wait to play it. This is the kind of art that I love to hear about existing in the world, the kind that gives us a vision of a future where we thrive. As much fun as dystopian endtimes are to read about and watch, living through one is becoming less and less fun.


Are there native Rhode Island plants that are similar to native Pacific Northwest plants?

RI Native Plant Guide

I don’t know, but I found this link that is at least a bit of a start to finding out. This is more research for my new obsession of eating like my ancestors. The Guide will filter by edible plants.


I like cranberries–are they native to RI? And how did the Narragansetts eat them if so?

Native Fruit: Cranberry for all Seasons

Called sasemineash by the Narragansett and sassamenesh by the Algonquin and Wampanoag tribes, the tart berries were an important food source, as early European settlers came to discover. To make pemmican, the fruit (or another berry) was incorporated with pulverized dried fish or meat and melted tallow, and formed into cakes baked by the sun. An endurance athlete of today knows that a proper combination of fat and carbohydrates is necessary to fuel the body. Pemmican was the original power food as this provision provided energy, lasted for months, and was easily portable on long journeys. 

The Indians and English use them [cranberries] much, boyling them with Sugar for Sauce to eat with their Meate, and it is a delicate sauce…

Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon), wild in only certain parts of the Northeast and Pacific Northwest…

Julia Blakely, Smithsonian Libraries and Archives

Well, some of the recipes to try are going to be interesting, for sure. But cranberries are easy to get on both sides of the country at least.